The goal of this blog is to show how crime has evolved throughout history.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
March 28, 1999:
Serbian paramilitary and military forces kill 146 Kosovo Albanians in the Izbica massacre during the Kosovo War. 
Izbica had been considered safe for Kosovo Albanians from other areas to hide, partly because the Kosovo Liberation Army was there. Thousands of ethnic Albanians had come from Drenica to Izbica after NATO started bombing the country. 
On March 27, Yugoslav soldiers, police and paramilitaries entered the village in camouflage. Some were wearing ski masks and had their faces blackened. 
By the next day, nearly all the ethnic Albanian men had fled to the mountains, leaving mostly women, children and old men still in Izbica. National security forces threatened to kill the villagers and demanded money. After they got what they wanted, they separated the men from the women and children, who were sent to Albania. The men were executed with automatic weapons. 
When former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic and others were indicted in the War Crimes Tribunal, Izibica was cited. Unfortunately, Milosevic died in prison. 

March 28, 1999:

Serbian paramilitary and military forces kill 146 Kosovo Albanians in the Izbica massacre during the Kosovo War. 

Izbica had been considered safe for Kosovo Albanians from other areas to hide, partly because the Kosovo Liberation Army was there. Thousands of ethnic Albanians had come from Drenica to Izbica after NATO started bombing the country. 

On March 27, Yugoslav soldiers, police and paramilitaries entered the village in camouflage. Some were wearing ski masks and had their faces blackened. 

By the next day, nearly all the ethnic Albanian men had fled to the mountains, leaving mostly women, children and old men still in Izbica. National security forces threatened to kill the villagers and demanded money. After they got what they wanted, they separated the men from the women and children, who were sent to Albania. The men were executed with automatic weapons. 

When former Yugoslav president Slobodan Milosevic and others were indicted in the War Crimes Tribunal, Izibica was cited. Unfortunately, Milosevic died in prison.