The goal of this blog is to show how crime has evolved throughout history.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
March 27, 1836:
The Goliad massacre takes place with Antonio López de Santa Anna, a general in the Mexican army who later became president of Mexico, orders the army to kill about 400 Texan prisoners of war in Goliad, Texas. 
Santa Anna had sent General Jose Urrea into Texas, and he quickly surrounded 300 men in the Texian Army near Goliad. After a two-day battle, the Texian forces surrendered, believing they would be released into the United States (Texas was then an independent republic). 
Several more battalions were taken prisoner after March 19. Urrea wrote to Santa Anna, asking for clemency for the Texians, who, under Mexican law, were required to be executed as ‘pirates.’ Santa Anna told Urrea to comply with the law. 
Three hundred and three Texians were shot point blank outside Fort Defiance; any survivors were clubbed and knifed to death. Forty Texians who couldn’t walk were killed at the fort. Colonel Fannin was the last to be executed, and was taken to the front of the chapel, blindfolded, seated in a chair, and shot in the face. 

March 27, 1836:

The Goliad massacre takes place with Antonio López de Santa Anna, a general in the Mexican army who later became president of Mexico, orders the army to kill about 400 Texan prisoners of war in Goliad, Texas. 

Santa Anna had sent General Jose Urrea into Texas, and he quickly surrounded 300 men in the Texian Army near Goliad. After a two-day battle, the Texian forces surrendered, believing they would be released into the United States (Texas was then an independent republic). 

Several more battalions were taken prisoner after March 19. Urrea wrote to Santa Anna, asking for clemency for the Texians, who, under Mexican law, were required to be executed as ‘pirates.’ Santa Anna told Urrea to comply with the law. 

Three hundred and three Texians were shot point blank outside Fort Defiance; any survivors were clubbed and knifed to death. Forty Texians who couldn’t walk were killed at the fort. Colonel Fannin was the last to be executed, and was taken to the front of the chapel, blindfolded, seated in a chair, and shot in the face.